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80 Lesser-Known Facts About Colombia

Colombia is the second-most biodiverse country in the world, with over 1,900 species of birds and numerous unique ecosystems.

The country has the world’s largest number of orchid species, with over 4,000 different types.

Colombia is home to the world’s tallest palm trees, the wax palms, found in the Cocora Valley.

The Magdalena River is Colombia’s longest river, stretching over 1,500 kilometers.

Colombia has two coastlines, one on the Pacific Ocean and one on the Caribbean Sea.

Colombia has the second-highest coastal mountain range in the world, the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta.

The town of Villa de Leyva is home to one of the largest squares in South America, Plaza Mayor.

Colombia is one of the few countries in the world where you can find all climates: tropical, desert, mountainous, and even snow-capped peaks.

Colombia has a tradition of colorful “jeep” Willys, originally left by the United States after World War II.

The city of Medellín is known as the “City of Eternal Spring” due to its pleasant climate year-round.

Colombia’s San Andres Archipelago in the Caribbean is closer to Nicaragua than to mainland Colombia.

Colombia has the world’s largest emerald industry, producing over 70% of the world’s emeralds.

The Amazon rainforest covers nearly a third of Colombia’s territory, making it an incredibly biodiverse country.

Colombia is one of the world’s leading producers of flowers, especially roses and carnations.

The country has a strong coffee culture and is one of the top producers of high-quality Arabica coffee beans.

Colombia has a rich indigenous heritage, with over 87 distinct indigenous groups.

The Tatacoa Desert in Colombia is not a true desert but rather a dry tropical forest with unique rock formations.

The Salt Cathedral of Zipaquirá, near Bogotá, is an underground church built inside a salt mine.

Colombia has over 3,000 kilometers of coastline, including both the Pacific and Caribbean coasts.

Colombia’s national tree is the wax palm (Ceroxylon quindiuense), which can reach heights of over 60 meters.

The country has a diverse cuisine, influenced by indigenous, Spanish, African, and Middle Eastern cultures.

Colombia is known for its diverse music genres, including cumbia, vallenato, salsa, and reggaeton.

The city of Cartagena was once a major Spanish port and is now a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Colombia has a tradition of colorful “jeep” Willys, originally left by the United States after World War II.

The city of Medellín is known as the “City of Eternal Spring” due to its pleasant climate year-round.

Colombia’s San Andres Archipelago in the Caribbean is closer to Nicaragua than to mainland Colombia.

Colombia has the world’s largest emerald industry, producing over 70% of the world’s emeralds.

The Amazon rainforest covers nearly a third of Colombia’s territory, making it an incredibly biodiverse country.

Colombia is one of the world’s leading producers of flowers, especially roses and carnations.

The country has a strong coffee culture and is one of the top producers of high-quality Arabica coffee beans.

Colombia has a rich indigenous heritage, with over 87 distinct indigenous groups.

The Tatacoa Desert in Colombia is not a true desert but rather a dry tropical forest with unique rock formations.

The Salt Cathedral of Zipaquirá, near Bogotá, is an underground church built inside a salt mine.

Colombia has over 3,000 kilometers of coastline, including both the Pacific and Caribbean coasts.

Colombia’s national tree is the wax palm (Ceroxylon quindiuense), which can reach heights of over 60 meters.

The country has a diverse cuisine, influenced by indigenous, Spanish, African, and Middle Eastern cultures.

Colombia is known for its diverse music genres, including cumbia, vallenato, salsa, and reggaeton.

The city of Cartagena was once a major Spanish port and is now a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Colombia has a strong tradition of colorful “jeep” Willys, originally left by the United States after World War II.

The city of Medellín is known as the “City of Eternal Spring” due to its pleasant climate year-round.

Colombia’s San Andres Archipelago in the Caribbean is closer to Nicaragua than to mainland Colombia.

Colombia has the world’s largest emerald industry, producing over 70% of the world’s emeralds.

The Amazon rainforest covers nearly a third of Colombia’s territory, making it an incredibly biodiverse country.

Colombia is one of the world’s leading producers of flowers, especially roses and carnations.

The country has a strong coffee culture and is one of the top producers of high-quality Arabica coffee beans.

Colombia has a rich indigenous heritage, with over 87 distinct indigenous groups.

The Tatacoa Desert in Colombia is not a true desert but rather a dry tropical forest with unique rock formations.

The Salt Cathedral of Zipaquirá, near Bogotá, is an underground church built inside a salt mine.

Colombia has over 3,000 kilometers of coastline, including both the Pacific and Caribbean coasts.

Colombia’s national tree is the wax palm (Ceroxylon quindiuense), which can reach heights of over 60 meters.

The country has a diverse cuisine, influenced by indigenous, Spanish, African, and Middle Eastern cultures.

Colombia is known for its diverse music genres, including cumbia, vallenato, salsa, and reggaeton.

The city of Cartagena was once a major Spanish port and is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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