10 Undiscovered Places in Northern Italy

Finding hidden spots that are off-the-beaten-path that many tourists frequent is one of the best aspects of travelling. And not so many European hideouts offer that same experience as the Northern region of Italy. Discovering its secret locations is one of the best things to do in the northern region of Italy. It is widely renowned for its stunning countryside, rich history, and huge wineries.

A whole new world of culinary, historical, cultural, and aesthetic delights awaits you if you decide to explore Italy off the usual path. Italy has many beautiful and historical locations that tourists long to visit! Rome, Florence, Venice, and the Amalfi and Cinque Terre coasts can all be reached via a well-traveled route, but if you go a little off-script, you’ll see another side of Italy.

In that case, towns less known to tourists should receive much attention as they are home to popular attractions associated with northern Italy, such as race cars, chocolate spreads, and scenic views.

The following are the top ten most incredible hidden locations in Northern Italy that you should consider exploring on your next trip.

10. Treviso

Because its network of canals closely resembles the city’s famous canals, Treviso is known as one of the Little Venices. Due to the town’s 15th-century structures’ excellent preservation, it is the epitome of vintage.

The Renaissance palace, Palazzo Protorio, is located in Piazza Dei Signori, where visitors can take a promenade. Treviso offers additional attractions, including the San Pietro cathedral, the City Walls and Gates, and Villa Emo. The magnificent water canals should not be missed, just like in Venice.

9. Ravenna

Among Ravenna’s attractions are its gastronomy, music, art, culture, history, beaches, wine, and mosaics. Eight UNESCO-listed sites are found here, along with a music festival that lasts for two months. In addition, tourists will encounter Dante Alighieri’s tomb, local cuisine and wine, a nearby beach resort, and a pine forest. In addition, the city is well-known for its fifth- and sixth-century mosaics, which are found all over the city.

8. Saturnia Hot Springs

Tuscany’s spa town is home to Saturnia Hot Springs. Although it is known as Italy’s best-kept secret, it is no longer a secret because of its growing popularity. It boasts streams of glistening blue water warmed by the nearby volcano. The spring is kept at 37 degrees by the water stream.

Saturnia (Tuscany, Italy) – The thermal sulphurous water of Saturnia, province of Grosseto, Tuscany region, during the winter

The best option would be to take a tranquil soak in one of the spring’s many pools, especially if visitors arrive during sunrise and dusk. Don’t worry; this location is open round-the-clock and free.

7. Camogli

The lively and traditional Italian beach town of Camogli is situated on the Ligurian Riviera di Levante. The magnificent beaches, Ligurian cuisine, the quaint fishing harbor, Italian culture, and calm, rural surroundings of this town draw tourists from all over the world.

The neighborhood is dominated by tall, brightly painted homes. Two of Camogli’s most well-known foods are anchovies and tuna in particular, as well as pesto, a sauce made of basil and pine nuts.

6. Lake Orta

In Piedmont, close to the Swiss border, amid a lush forest and rocky Alps foothills, is Lago di Orta, also known as Lake Orta. Given that it is less well-known than other northern lakes like Como, Garda, and Maggiore, this is an excellent illustration of undiscovered Italy.

The historic village of Orta San Giulio, which features Baroque and Medieval buildings, cobblestone streets, Piazza Motta, and the lake itself, is a great day trip. However, the biggest surprise is the enigmatic island in the middle of the lake, where the local nuns go to meditate.

5. Passo Gardena

Passo Gardena, which translates as Garden Pass, is a well-liked road by motorists and bikers. It is evident from the name that this is a mountain pass that offers bikers a panoramic vista of mountain ranges, including the stunning Dolomite highlands.

The construction of the pass during World War 1 served historical purposes. There are lodging options and other shops for travelers’ convenience on top of the pass.

4. Aosta Valley

Vacationers can enjoy Valle d’Aosta’s scenic splendor in Aosta Valley. It is the ideal hidden getaway for anyone looking for a far-flung vacation with a beautiful view of its ski mountains, hot springs for the winter, retro-style lodgings, and well-liked excursions through the valley.

Year-round, Aosta Valley has top-notch recreational opportunities. In the winter, it provides the best skiing in all of Italy, while in the summer, its hiking routes offer the best views of mountain ranges.

3. Trieste

Trieste is a city in northern Italy near the Slovenian border with a distinctive dialect that combines Italian, Greek, Austrian-German, and Croatian. The neoclassical waterfront is breathtaking and has a marina filled with fashionable, shimmering ships. Trieste is a city in Italy that should be included on any trip to Northern Italy because of its wide sandy beaches, city lidos, and neighboring vineyards.

2. Bergamo

Italians prefer to keep to themselves in locations like Bergamo. This small town’s streets are as charming as the historic façade of the neighboring structures and lanes. This historic town is home to a magnificent basilica with gold-accented ceilings and furnishings. The Duomo di Bergamo, Capella Colleoni, and many more are sophisticated structures.

1. Chiusa / Klausen

One of Italy’s most picturesque settlements, Chiusa, is located on the banks of the Isarco River (also known as Klausen). Some of the nation’s earliest art scenes, which stretch back more than a century, can be found in this charming tiny Tyrolean town.

Chestnut woods, lush pastures, vineyards, and farmsteads surround Chiusa. Visitors are charmed by the village’s winding lanes, historic homes, historical scenery, coats of arms, huge bay windows, gothic churches, a crenelated façade, and two central squares.

The town is proud of its museum, which exhibits priceless works by Italian and Spanish artists from centuries ago, including paintings and ceramics from the Loreto treasures. In addition, Chiusa has some of the top restaurants, including Turmmwirt, Gasthof Walter, Pizzahouse Torgglkeller, and Ristorante Vital Jasmin nel Hotel Bischofhof, serving dishes with flavors from the Alpine to the Mediterranean.

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